Autophagy represents a key mechanism of cytoprotection that can be activated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular stresses and allows the cell to sequester cytoplasmic components and damaged organelles, delivering them to lysosomes for degradation and recycling. However, the autophagy process has also been associated with the death of the cell. It has been demonstrated to be constitutive in some instances and inducible in others, and the idea that it could represent a pathogenetic determinant as well as a possible prognostic tool and a therapeutic target in a plethora of human diseases has recently been considered. Among these, cancer represents a major one. In this review, we recapitulate the critical implications of autophagy in the pathogenesis, progression, and treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukemias and lymphomas, in fact, represent paradigmatic human diseases in which advances have recently been made in this respect.

Autophagy represents a key mechanism of cytoprotection that can be activated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular stresses and allows the cell to sequester cytoplasmic components and damaged organelles, delivering them to lysosomes for degradation and recycling. However, the autophagy process has also been associated with the death of the cell. It has been demonstrated to be constitutive in some instances and inducible in others, and the idea that it could represent a pathogenetic determinant as well as a possible prognostic tool and a therapeutic target in a plethora of human diseases has recently been considered. Among these, cancer represents a major one. In this review, we recapitulate the critical implications of autophagy in the pathogenesis, progression, and treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukemias and lymphomas, in fact, represent paradigmatic human diseases in which advances have recently been made in this respect.

Autophagy as a pathogenic mechanism and drug target in lymphoproliferative disorders

C. Carlo-Stella;
2014-01-01

Abstract

Autophagy represents a key mechanism of cytoprotection that can be activated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular stresses and allows the cell to sequester cytoplasmic components and damaged organelles, delivering them to lysosomes for degradation and recycling. However, the autophagy process has also been associated with the death of the cell. It has been demonstrated to be constitutive in some instances and inducible in others, and the idea that it could represent a pathogenetic determinant as well as a possible prognostic tool and a therapeutic target in a plethora of human diseases has recently been considered. Among these, cancer represents a major one. In this review, we recapitulate the critical implications of autophagy in the pathogenesis, progression, and treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukemias and lymphomas, in fact, represent paradigmatic human diseases in which advances have recently been made in this respect.
Autophagy represents a key mechanism of cytoprotection that can be activated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular stresses and allows the cell to sequester cytoplasmic components and damaged organelles, delivering them to lysosomes for degradation and recycling. However, the autophagy process has also been associated with the death of the cell. It has been demonstrated to be constitutive in some instances and inducible in others, and the idea that it could represent a pathogenetic determinant as well as a possible prognostic tool and a therapeutic target in a plethora of human diseases has recently been considered. Among these, cancer represents a major one. In this review, we recapitulate the critical implications of autophagy in the pathogenesis, progression, and treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukemias and lymphomas, in fact, represent paradigmatic human diseases in which advances have recently been made in this respect.
Hodgkin's lymphoma; cancer; cell fate; lymphocytes; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; Animals; Autophagy; Hodgkin Disease; Humans; Lymphocytes; Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin; Lymphoproliferative Disorders
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/1114
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