Patients with limited cardiopulmonary reserve are at risk of mortality and morbidity after major surgery. Augmentation of oxygen delivery index (DO2I) with i.v. fluids and inotropes (goal-directed therapy, GDT) has been shown to reduce postoperative mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. Concerns regarding cardiac complications associated with fluid challenges and inotropes may prevent clinicians from performing GDT in patients who need it most. We hypothesized that GDT is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac complications in high-risk, non-cardiac surgical patients. We performed a systematic search of Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of GDT in high-risk surgical patients. Studies including cardiac surgery, trauma, and paediatric surgery were excluded. We reviewed the rates of all cardiac complications, arrhythmias, myocardial ischaemia, and acute pulmonary oedema. Meta-analyses were performed using RevMan software. Data are presented as odds ratios (ORs), [95 confidence intervals (CIs)], and P-values. Twenty-two RCTs including 2129 patients reported cardiac complications. GDT was associated with a reduction in total cardiovascular (CVS) complications [OR0.54, (0.380.76), P0.0005] and arrhythmias [OR0.54, (0.350.85), P0.007]. GDT was not associated with an increase in acute pulmonary oedema [OR0.69, (0.431.10), P0.12] or myocardial ischaemia [OR0.70, (0.381.28), P0.25]. Subgroup analysis revealed the benefit is most pronounced in patients receiving fluid and inotrope therapy to achieve a supranormal DO2I, with the use of minimally invasive cardiac output monitors. Treatment of high-risk surgical patients GDT is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac complications; GDT with fluids and inotropes to optimize DO2I during early GDT reduces postoperative CVS complications.

Cardiac complications associated with goal-directed therapy in high-risk surgical patients: a meta-analysis

Cecconi M
2014

Abstract

Patients with limited cardiopulmonary reserve are at risk of mortality and morbidity after major surgery. Augmentation of oxygen delivery index (DO2I) with i.v. fluids and inotropes (goal-directed therapy, GDT) has been shown to reduce postoperative mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. Concerns regarding cardiac complications associated with fluid challenges and inotropes may prevent clinicians from performing GDT in patients who need it most. We hypothesized that GDT is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac complications in high-risk, non-cardiac surgical patients. We performed a systematic search of Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of GDT in high-risk surgical patients. Studies including cardiac surgery, trauma, and paediatric surgery were excluded. We reviewed the rates of all cardiac complications, arrhythmias, myocardial ischaemia, and acute pulmonary oedema. Meta-analyses were performed using RevMan software. Data are presented as odds ratios (ORs), [95 confidence intervals (CIs)], and P-values. Twenty-two RCTs including 2129 patients reported cardiac complications. GDT was associated with a reduction in total cardiovascular (CVS) complications [OR0.54, (0.380.76), P0.0005] and arrhythmias [OR0.54, (0.350.85), P0.007]. GDT was not associated with an increase in acute pulmonary oedema [OR0.69, (0.431.10), P0.12] or myocardial ischaemia [OR0.70, (0.381.28), P0.25]. Subgroup analysis revealed the benefit is most pronounced in patients receiving fluid and inotrope therapy to achieve a supranormal DO2I, with the use of minimally invasive cardiac output monitors. Treatment of high-risk surgical patients GDT is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac complications; GDT with fluids and inotropes to optimize DO2I during early GDT reduces postoperative CVS complications.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/4084
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 97
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 78
social impact