Objective Bone fractures are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly in the US. The present study assesses the possible role of a number of risk factors for postmenopausal bone fractures. Methods We analysed the relationships of anthropometric, demographic and lifestyle factors with the risk of bone fracture among 6250 postmenopausal women in a prospective cohort study, the New York University Women's Health Study. Results After an average of 7.6 years of follow-up, 1025 new incident bone fractures were reported, including 34 hip and 159 wrist fractures (incidence rates; 71.6 and 334.7 per 10(5) woman-yeats, respectively). The risk of fracture increased with increasing age, body height and total fat intake, while it was significantly lower among obese and African American women. The relative risk among African Americans was 0.45 (95% CI: 0.32-0.63) compared with non-African Americans. Women taller than 170 cm had a 64% increase in risk of fractures, as compared with those under 155 cm. These associations were generally more pronounced when fractures were limited to those at the hip and wrist. Conclusions The present study provides an indication for a potential role of dietary fat in the development of postmenopausal fractures and further evidence to support protective effects of obesity, short stature and African American ethnicity.

Diet, smoking and anthropometric indices and postmenopausal bone fractures: a prospective study

Riboli E
2000

Abstract

Objective Bone fractures are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly in the US. The present study assesses the possible role of a number of risk factors for postmenopausal bone fractures. Methods We analysed the relationships of anthropometric, demographic and lifestyle factors with the risk of bone fracture among 6250 postmenopausal women in a prospective cohort study, the New York University Women's Health Study. Results After an average of 7.6 years of follow-up, 1025 new incident bone fractures were reported, including 34 hip and 159 wrist fractures (incidence rates; 71.6 and 334.7 per 10(5) woman-yeats, respectively). The risk of fracture increased with increasing age, body height and total fat intake, while it was significantly lower among obese and African American women. The relative risk among African Americans was 0.45 (95% CI: 0.32-0.63) compared with non-African Americans. Women taller than 170 cm had a 64% increase in risk of fractures, as compared with those under 155 cm. These associations were generally more pronounced when fractures were limited to those at the hip and wrist. Conclusions The present study provides an indication for a potential role of dietary fat in the development of postmenopausal fractures and further evidence to support protective effects of obesity, short stature and African American ethnicity.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11699/4739
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