Purpose Hypovitaminosis D has emerged as potential risk factor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the general population with variable effects on the outcome of the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to investigate the impact of hypovitaminosis D and secondary hyperparathyroidism on respiratory outcomes of COVID-19. Methods Three-hundred-forty-eight consecutive patients hospitalized for COVID-19 at the IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan (Italy) were evaluated for arterial partial pressure oxygen (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio, serum 25hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], parathyroid hormone (PTH) and inflammatory parameters at study entry and need of ventilation during the hospital stay. Results In the entire population, vitamin D deficiency (i.e., 25(OH)D values < 12 ng/mL) was significantly associated with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure at the study entry [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.48, 95% confidence interval 1.29-4.74; P = 0.006], independently of age and sex of subjects, serum calcium and inflammatory parameters. In patients evaluated for serum PTH (97 cases), secondary hyperparathyroidism combined with vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure at study entry (P = 0.001) and need of ventilation during the hospital stay (P = 0.031). Conclusion This study provides evidence that vitamin D deficiency, when associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism, may negatively impact the clinical outcome of SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia.

Vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism and respiratory insufficiency in hospitalized patients with COVID-19

Mazziotti, G;Sandri, M T;Voza, A;Lania, A G
2021

Abstract

Purpose Hypovitaminosis D has emerged as potential risk factor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the general population with variable effects on the outcome of the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to investigate the impact of hypovitaminosis D and secondary hyperparathyroidism on respiratory outcomes of COVID-19. Methods Three-hundred-forty-eight consecutive patients hospitalized for COVID-19 at the IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan (Italy) were evaluated for arterial partial pressure oxygen (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio, serum 25hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], parathyroid hormone (PTH) and inflammatory parameters at study entry and need of ventilation during the hospital stay. Results In the entire population, vitamin D deficiency (i.e., 25(OH)D values < 12 ng/mL) was significantly associated with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure at the study entry [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.48, 95% confidence interval 1.29-4.74; P = 0.006], independently of age and sex of subjects, serum calcium and inflammatory parameters. In patients evaluated for serum PTH (97 cases), secondary hyperparathyroidism combined with vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure at study entry (P = 0.001) and need of ventilation during the hospital stay (P = 0.031). Conclusion This study provides evidence that vitamin D deficiency, when associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism, may negatively impact the clinical outcome of SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia.
COVID-19
Hyperparathyroidism
PTH
Pneumonia
SARS-CoV-2 infection
Vitamin D
Vitamin D deficiency
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
COVID-19
Female
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Insufficiency
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin D Deficiency
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/64507
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact