While the selection of complex HBV drug-resistance patterns on therapeutic failure can compromise the efficacy of anti-HBV therapies, recent data show that patients failing treatment without drug-resistance have a rate of virological success close to drug-naive patients. The goal of this study is defining, in clinical practice, the burden of drug-resistance mutations in a cohort of patients treated with anti-HBV drugs. Prevalence and patterns of drug-resistance were analyzed by RT-sequencing in 204 patients infected chronically: 148 experiencing virological rebound (defined as an increase in serum HBV-DNA>20IU/ml after achieving virological success [HBV-DNA<20IU/ml]), and 56 null/partial responders (always detectable serum HBV-DNA [>20IU/ml] within 48 weeks of therapy). The highest rate of drug-resistance was observed in patients experiencing virological rebound (prevalence, 79.1%). Conversely, almost half (46.4%) null/partial responders have no evidence of drug-resistance. The rate of drug-resistance was higher in patients treated with lamivudine (76.8% [109/142]) and telbivudine (83.3% [5/6]), followed by adefovir (62.5% [15/24]), and entecavir (52.2% [12/23]). Complex mutational patterns characterized by the co-presence of rtM204V/I-rtA181T/V (impairing the efficacy of all anti-HBV drugs) were detected in four patients (2.7%) with virological rebound. Drug-resistance is the main cause of failure to therapy in patients experiencing virological rebound, supporting the need of rapid switch to anti-HBV drugs with higher genetic barrier and potency (entecavir/tenofovir). Conversely, nearly half of null/partial responders shows no evidence of drug-resistance mutations, maintaining high chance of achieving therapeutic success with the same class of drug. In this setting, genotypic resistance may help in selecting patients still carrying wild-type viruses, that may take major benefits from antiviral treatment. J. Med. Virol. 85: 9961004, 2013. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Snapshot on drug-resistance rate and profiles in patients with chronic hepatitis B receiving nucleos(t)ide analogues in clinical practice

Cento, V;
2013

Abstract

While the selection of complex HBV drug-resistance patterns on therapeutic failure can compromise the efficacy of anti-HBV therapies, recent data show that patients failing treatment without drug-resistance have a rate of virological success close to drug-naive patients. The goal of this study is defining, in clinical practice, the burden of drug-resistance mutations in a cohort of patients treated with anti-HBV drugs. Prevalence and patterns of drug-resistance were analyzed by RT-sequencing in 204 patients infected chronically: 148 experiencing virological rebound (defined as an increase in serum HBV-DNA>20IU/ml after achieving virological success [HBV-DNA<20IU/ml]), and 56 null/partial responders (always detectable serum HBV-DNA [>20IU/ml] within 48 weeks of therapy). The highest rate of drug-resistance was observed in patients experiencing virological rebound (prevalence, 79.1%). Conversely, almost half (46.4%) null/partial responders have no evidence of drug-resistance. The rate of drug-resistance was higher in patients treated with lamivudine (76.8% [109/142]) and telbivudine (83.3% [5/6]), followed by adefovir (62.5% [15/24]), and entecavir (52.2% [12/23]). Complex mutational patterns characterized by the co-presence of rtM204V/I-rtA181T/V (impairing the efficacy of all anti-HBV drugs) were detected in four patients (2.7%) with virological rebound. Drug-resistance is the main cause of failure to therapy in patients experiencing virological rebound, supporting the need of rapid switch to anti-HBV drugs with higher genetic barrier and potency (entecavir/tenofovir). Conversely, nearly half of null/partial responders shows no evidence of drug-resistance mutations, maintaining high chance of achieving therapeutic success with the same class of drug. In this setting, genotypic resistance may help in selecting patients still carrying wild-type viruses, that may take major benefits from antiviral treatment. J. Med. Virol. 85: 9961004, 2013. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
drug resistance
HBV D and A genotype
genotypic testing
NUCs treatment
Adenine
Adult
Antiviral Agents
Cohort Studies
DNA, Viral
Drug Resistance, Viral
Female
Guanine
Hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis B, Chronic
Humans
Lamivudine
Male
Middle Aged
Organophosphonates
Recurrence
Telbivudine
Thymidine
Treatment Outcome
Mutation
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/65864
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 17
social impact