Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at increased risk for thrombotic and bleeding complications compared to patients with chronic coronary syndrome (CCS). The academic research consortium (ARC) recently suggested a set of criteria to identify patients at high bleeding risk (HBR). We sought to evaluate the performance of the ARC-HBR criteria among patients undergoing PCI according to clinical presentation. We included all consecutive patients undergoing PCI at a tertiary-care center. Patients were deemed at HBR if they fulfilled ≥ 1 major or ≥ 2 minor ARC-HBR criteria. The primary bleeding endpoint was a composite of in-hospital or post-discharge bleeding at 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes included all-cause death and myocardial infarction. Out of 6068 patients, 1391 (22.9 %) presented with AMI and were more often at HBR than those with CCS (46.9 % vs. 43.0 %, p = 0.01). HBR patients had a higher risk for the primary bleeding endpoint than non-HBR, irrespective of the clinical indication for PCI (AMI: 19.5 % vs. 5.5 %; HR 3.86, 95 % CI 2.63-5.69; CCS: 6.8 % vs. 2.6 %; HR 2.65, 95 % CI 1.92-3.68; p-interaction = 0.11). Secondary outcomes followed a similar trend. After multivariable adjustment, AMI presentation remained significantly associated with increased risk for bleeding at 1 year (HR 1.64, 95 % CI 1.13-2.38, p = 0.01). The ARC-HBR criterion associated with the highest bleeding risk was severe/end-stage chronic kidney disease in AMI and moderate/severe anemia in CCS. The ARC-HBR framework successfully identified AMI and CCS patients with increased risk for bleeding complications at 1 year post-PCI. Figure prepared with BioRender.

Performance of the academic research consortium high-bleeding risk criteria in patients undergoing PCI for acute myocardial infarction

Cao, Davide;Chiarito, Mauro;
2022

Abstract

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at increased risk for thrombotic and bleeding complications compared to patients with chronic coronary syndrome (CCS). The academic research consortium (ARC) recently suggested a set of criteria to identify patients at high bleeding risk (HBR). We sought to evaluate the performance of the ARC-HBR criteria among patients undergoing PCI according to clinical presentation. We included all consecutive patients undergoing PCI at a tertiary-care center. Patients were deemed at HBR if they fulfilled ≥ 1 major or ≥ 2 minor ARC-HBR criteria. The primary bleeding endpoint was a composite of in-hospital or post-discharge bleeding at 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes included all-cause death and myocardial infarction. Out of 6068 patients, 1391 (22.9 %) presented with AMI and were more often at HBR than those with CCS (46.9 % vs. 43.0 %, p = 0.01). HBR patients had a higher risk for the primary bleeding endpoint than non-HBR, irrespective of the clinical indication for PCI (AMI: 19.5 % vs. 5.5 %; HR 3.86, 95 % CI 2.63-5.69; CCS: 6.8 % vs. 2.6 %; HR 2.65, 95 % CI 1.92-3.68; p-interaction = 0.11). Secondary outcomes followed a similar trend. After multivariable adjustment, AMI presentation remained significantly associated with increased risk for bleeding at 1 year (HR 1.64, 95 % CI 1.13-2.38, p = 0.01). The ARC-HBR criterion associated with the highest bleeding risk was severe/end-stage chronic kidney disease in AMI and moderate/severe anemia in CCS. The ARC-HBR framework successfully identified AMI and CCS patients with increased risk for bleeding complications at 1 year post-PCI. Figure prepared with BioRender.
ARC-HBR
High bleeding risk
Percutaneous coronary intervention
Aftercare
Humans
Patient Discharge
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Risk Factors
Treatment Outcome
Myocardial Infarction
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/69689
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