Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is strongly associated with the development of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Limited data are available on risk factors for difficult to manage bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in COPD patients with CAP. Our objective was to assess the microbiological patterns associated with risk factors that determine empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitalized COPD patients with CAP. Methods: We performed a secondary data analysis of an international, multicenter, observational, point-prevalence study involving hospitalized COPD patients with CAP from March to June 2015. After identifying the risk factors associated with different microorganisms, we developed a scoring system to guide decision-making about empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy in this population. Results: We enrolled 689 hospitalized COPD patients with CAP with documented microbiological testing. The most frequent microorganisms isolated were Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Gram-negative bacteria (8%), P. aeruginosa (7%) and Haemophilus influenzae (3%). We developed a scoring system incorporating the variables independently associated with P. aeruginosa that include a previous P. aeruginosa isolation or infection (OR 14.2 [95%CI 5.7-35.2]), hospitalization in the past 12 months (OR 3.7 [1.5-9.2]), and bronchiectasis (OR 3.2 [1.4-7.2]). Empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotics were overutilized in COPD patients with CAP. The new scoring system has the potential to reduce empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotic use from 54.1% to 6.2%. Conclusions: COPD patients with CAP present different microbiological profiles associated with unique risk factors. Anti-pseudomonal treatment is a critical decision when selecting empiric antibiotic therapy. We developed a COPD scoring system to guide decision-making about empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy.

Bacterial Patterns and Empiric Antibiotic Use in COPD Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Amati, Francesco
Formal Analysis
;
Aliberti, Stefano
Validation
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is strongly associated with the development of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Limited data are available on risk factors for difficult to manage bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in COPD patients with CAP. Our objective was to assess the microbiological patterns associated with risk factors that determine empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitalized COPD patients with CAP. Methods: We performed a secondary data analysis of an international, multicenter, observational, point-prevalence study involving hospitalized COPD patients with CAP from March to June 2015. After identifying the risk factors associated with different microorganisms, we developed a scoring system to guide decision-making about empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy in this population. Results: We enrolled 689 hospitalized COPD patients with CAP with documented microbiological testing. The most frequent microorganisms isolated were Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Gram-negative bacteria (8%), P. aeruginosa (7%) and Haemophilus influenzae (3%). We developed a scoring system incorporating the variables independently associated with P. aeruginosa that include a previous P. aeruginosa isolation or infection (OR 14.2 [95%CI 5.7-35.2]), hospitalization in the past 12 months (OR 3.7 [1.5-9.2]), and bronchiectasis (OR 3.2 [1.4-7.2]). Empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotics were overutilized in COPD patients with CAP. The new scoring system has the potential to reduce empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotic use from 54.1% to 6.2%. Conclusions: COPD patients with CAP present different microbiological profiles associated with unique risk factors. Anti-pseudomonal treatment is a critical decision when selecting empiric antibiotic therapy. We developed a COPD scoring system to guide decision-making about empiric anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy.
2022
Anti-bacterial agents
Antibiotics
COPD
Pseudomonas
Risk factors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/71418
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