Aim: Surgery is indicated in selected patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, due to a negative perception, surgery may be delayed, leading to possible unfavourable outcomes. The aim of this work was to investigate patients' perceptions of surgery and the impact on reported outcomes. Method: An international multilingual online survey was used to query IBD patients' experiences of surgery, information sources, expectations and concerns, quality of life (QoL) and feelings. Results: The survey was completed by 425 of 510 participants. Crohn's disease was more frequent (61%) than ulcerative colitis (36%). Most patients primarily learned about surgery from their gastroenterologist and were informed of the risks and benefits by the surgeon. In almost one-third of patients indication for surgery was not a shared decision between gastroenterologist and surgeon. Seventy per cent of patients naïve to surgery were not aware of any surgical options. The majority of patients (80%) perceived surgery as the last option after many medical treatments rather than an alternative therapeutic option (20%). Sixteen per cent of patients obtained their primary information from the Internet, while 82.4% used the Internet to obtain additional information. Fear of surgical complications was cited by 73% of patients, while relief from symptoms was indicated by 31%. Most patients coped with their stoma better than expected or as they expected. Negative feelings decreased after surgery, while a lasting improvement in positive feelings and QoL was reported. Conclusion: Despite the negative perception of surgery and the delayed involvement of surgeons as a source of information and in the decision-making process, the majority of respondents experienced positive outcomes from surgery, including improvement QoL and acceptance of the stoma.

Patients' perceptions of surgery for inflammatory bowel disease

Spinelli, Antonino;Carvello, Michele;Danese, Silvio;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Aim: Surgery is indicated in selected patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, due to a negative perception, surgery may be delayed, leading to possible unfavourable outcomes. The aim of this work was to investigate patients' perceptions of surgery and the impact on reported outcomes. Method: An international multilingual online survey was used to query IBD patients' experiences of surgery, information sources, expectations and concerns, quality of life (QoL) and feelings. Results: The survey was completed by 425 of 510 participants. Crohn's disease was more frequent (61%) than ulcerative colitis (36%). Most patients primarily learned about surgery from their gastroenterologist and were informed of the risks and benefits by the surgeon. In almost one-third of patients indication for surgery was not a shared decision between gastroenterologist and surgeon. Seventy per cent of patients naïve to surgery were not aware of any surgical options. The majority of patients (80%) perceived surgery as the last option after many medical treatments rather than an alternative therapeutic option (20%). Sixteen per cent of patients obtained their primary information from the Internet, while 82.4% used the Internet to obtain additional information. Fear of surgical complications was cited by 73% of patients, while relief from symptoms was indicated by 31%. Most patients coped with their stoma better than expected or as they expected. Negative feelings decreased after surgery, while a lasting improvement in positive feelings and QoL was reported. Conclusion: Despite the negative perception of surgery and the delayed involvement of surgeons as a source of information and in the decision-making process, the majority of respondents experienced positive outcomes from surgery, including improvement QoL and acceptance of the stoma.
2021
feelings
patients
patients reported outcomes
perception of surgery
quality of life
stoma acceptance
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/73076
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