Background: There is no standard therapy for acute liver failure. Hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed for temporary liver function support, while the injured liver regenerates or while waiting for transplantation. We have previously shown such efficacy for microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes in mice with fulminant liver failure. We aimed to establish a large animal model for fulminant liver failure to assess the efficacy of microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes in temporary liver function support. Methods: The model was developed in baboons; for testing microencapsulated hepatocytes, the best condition was 75% hepatectomy and 60 min warm ischemia time. Fulminant liver failure was characterized by steep increases in liver biochemical parameters, severe steatosis, and massive hepatocyte necrosis during the first 10 days. Hepatocytes from miniature swine were microencapsulated in alginate-poly-l-lysine microspheres, and transplanted intraperitoneally immediately after hepatectomy and warm ischemia (80-120 mL packed hepatocytes in 200-350 mL microspheres, about 30%-50% of the baboon's native liver volume). Results: In the control group, three of five animals were sacrificed after 6-10 days because of fulminant liver failure, and two of five animals recovered normal liver function and survived until elective euthanasia (28 days). In the treatment group of four animals, one animal developed liver failure but survived to 21 days, and three animals recovered completely with normal liver function. Conclusions: The results indicate that microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes provide temporary liver function support in baboons with fulminant liver failure. These data support development of this cell therapy product toward clinical trials in patients with acute liver failure.

Testing of microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes in a new model of fulminant liver failure in baboons

Carvello, Michele;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Background: There is no standard therapy for acute liver failure. Hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed for temporary liver function support, while the injured liver regenerates or while waiting for transplantation. We have previously shown such efficacy for microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes in mice with fulminant liver failure. We aimed to establish a large animal model for fulminant liver failure to assess the efficacy of microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes in temporary liver function support. Methods: The model was developed in baboons; for testing microencapsulated hepatocytes, the best condition was 75% hepatectomy and 60 min warm ischemia time. Fulminant liver failure was characterized by steep increases in liver biochemical parameters, severe steatosis, and massive hepatocyte necrosis during the first 10 days. Hepatocytes from miniature swine were microencapsulated in alginate-poly-l-lysine microspheres, and transplanted intraperitoneally immediately after hepatectomy and warm ischemia (80-120 mL packed hepatocytes in 200-350 mL microspheres, about 30%-50% of the baboon's native liver volume). Results: In the control group, three of five animals were sacrificed after 6-10 days because of fulminant liver failure, and two of five animals recovered normal liver function and survived until elective euthanasia (28 days). In the treatment group of four animals, one animal developed liver failure but survived to 21 days, and three animals recovered completely with normal liver function. Conclusions: The results indicate that microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes provide temporary liver function support in baboons with fulminant liver failure. These data support development of this cell therapy product toward clinical trials in patients with acute liver failure.
2017
cell microencapsulation
fulminant liver failure
hepatocyte transplantation
non-human primate
porcine hepatocytes
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/73686
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