Rationale: Eradication and suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key priority in national guidelines for bronchiectasis and is a major focus of drug development and clinical trials. An accurate estimation of the clinical impact of P. aeruginosa in bronchiectasis is therefore essential. Methods: Data derived from 21 observational cohort studies comparing patients with P. aeruginosa colonization with those without it were pooled by random effects meta-analysis. Data were collected for key longitudinal clinical outcomes of mortality, hospital admissions, exacerbations, and lung function decline, along with cross-sectional outcomes such as quality of life. MeasurementsandMainResults: In the aggregate, the included studies comprised 3,683 patients. P. aeruginosa was associated with a highly significant and consistent increase in all markers of disease severity, including mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-4.40; P <0.0001), hospital admissions (OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 3.19-13.51; P <0.0001), and exacerbations (mean difference, 0.97/yr; 95% CI, 0.64-1.30; P <0.0001). The patients with P. aeruginosa also had worse quality of life on the basis of their St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire results (mean difference, 18.2 points; 95% CI, 14.7-21.8; P <0.0001). Large differences in lung function and radiological severity were also observed. The definitions of colonization were inconsistent among the studies, but the findings were robust regardless of the definition used. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa is associated with an approximately threefold increased risk of death and an increase in hospital admissions and exacerbations in adult bronchiectasis.

A comprehensive analysis of the impact of pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization on prognosis in adult bronchiectasis

S. Aliberti;
2015-01-01

Abstract

Rationale: Eradication and suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key priority in national guidelines for bronchiectasis and is a major focus of drug development and clinical trials. An accurate estimation of the clinical impact of P. aeruginosa in bronchiectasis is therefore essential. Methods: Data derived from 21 observational cohort studies comparing patients with P. aeruginosa colonization with those without it were pooled by random effects meta-analysis. Data were collected for key longitudinal clinical outcomes of mortality, hospital admissions, exacerbations, and lung function decline, along with cross-sectional outcomes such as quality of life. MeasurementsandMainResults: In the aggregate, the included studies comprised 3,683 patients. P. aeruginosa was associated with a highly significant and consistent increase in all markers of disease severity, including mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-4.40; P <0.0001), hospital admissions (OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 3.19-13.51; P <0.0001), and exacerbations (mean difference, 0.97/yr; 95% CI, 0.64-1.30; P <0.0001). The patients with P. aeruginosa also had worse quality of life on the basis of their St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire results (mean difference, 18.2 points; 95% CI, 14.7-21.8; P <0.0001). Large differences in lung function and radiological severity were also observed. The definitions of colonization were inconsistent among the studies, but the findings were robust regardless of the definition used. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa is associated with an approximately threefold increased risk of death and an increase in hospital admissions and exacerbations in adult bronchiectasis.
2015
Bacteria
Bronchiectasis
Exacerbations
Mortality
Severity
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bronchiectasis
Disease Progression
Hospitalization
Humans
Observational Studies as Topic
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Pseudomonas Infections
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Quality of Life
Sputum
Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Medicine (all)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/74504
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