Objectives. To study the long-term outcomes of rotational atherectomy (RA) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background. There is little evidence on the incidence, procedural results and long-term outcomes of RA for CTO PCI. Methods. This registry included data from consecutive patients undergoing CTO PCI at four specialized centers. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE: cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction and ischemia-driven target-vessel revascularization) on follow-up were the primary endpoint. Results. A total of 1003 patients were included. Of these, 35 (3.5%) required RA. As compared with Conventional PCI, RA patients were older (68.9 ± 9.5 vs. 64.6 ± 10.7 years, P = 0.02), had higher prevalence of diabetes (58% vs. 37%, P = 0.01) and of a J-CTO score ⠥2 (80% vs. 58%, P = 0.009), driven by severe calcification. Antegrade wire escalation was used more frequently in RA (74% vs. 53%, P = 0.08). RA was performed for balloon failure-to-cross in 51% and failure-to-expand in 49%. One burr was utilized in 86%. The 1.25-mm burr was the largest burr used in 43%. Slow flow/no-reflow was observed in 17%. No other serious RA-related complications were observed. Procedural success was 77% vs. 89% (P = 0.04) in RA vs. Conventional PCI. After a mean follow-up of 658 ± 412 days, MACE rates were similar between groups (15% vs. 13%, P = 0.70). Conclusions. The use of RA in CTO PCI was safe, despite a worse patient risk profile and higher procedural complexity, as compared with conventional techniques. Although procedural success was lower in the RA group, there were no differences in long-term clinical outcomes between groups. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Long-term outcomes of rotational atherectomy for the percutaneous treatment of chronic total occlusions

COLOMBO, ANTONIO;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Objectives. To study the long-term outcomes of rotational atherectomy (RA) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background. There is little evidence on the incidence, procedural results and long-term outcomes of RA for CTO PCI. Methods. This registry included data from consecutive patients undergoing CTO PCI at four specialized centers. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE: cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction and ischemia-driven target-vessel revascularization) on follow-up were the primary endpoint. Results. A total of 1003 patients were included. Of these, 35 (3.5%) required RA. As compared with Conventional PCI, RA patients were older (68.9 ± 9.5 vs. 64.6 ± 10.7 years, P = 0.02), had higher prevalence of diabetes (58% vs. 37%, P = 0.01) and of a J-CTO score ⠥2 (80% vs. 58%, P = 0.009), driven by severe calcification. Antegrade wire escalation was used more frequently in RA (74% vs. 53%, P = 0.08). RA was performed for balloon failure-to-cross in 51% and failure-to-expand in 49%. One burr was utilized in 86%. The 1.25-mm burr was the largest burr used in 43%. Slow flow/no-reflow was observed in 17%. No other serious RA-related complications were observed. Procedural success was 77% vs. 89% (P = 0.04) in RA vs. Conventional PCI. After a mean follow-up of 658 ± 412 days, MACE rates were similar between groups (15% vs. 13%, P = 0.70). Conclusions. The use of RA in CTO PCI was safe, despite a worse patient risk profile and higher procedural complexity, as compared with conventional techniques. Although procedural success was lower in the RA group, there were no differences in long-term clinical outcomes between groups. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
2017
chronic total occlusion
percutaneous coronary intervention
rotational atherectomy
Aged
Atherectomy
Coronary
Chronic Disease
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Occlusion
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Postoperative Complications
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Registries
Radiology
Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/74893
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