The frequency of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions is high in total joint arthroplasties, and the hemorrhagic risk is associated with both surgery- and patient-related factors. This study aims to assess the ability of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) to identify patients at high risk for transfusion and excessive bleeding. A prospective observational study was conducted including 206 patients who underwent total knee or hip arthroplasties. Assessment of the coagulation status was performed preoperatively and immediately postoperatively using ROTEM analysis and conventional coagulation tests. The number of RBC transfusions and the postoperative hemoglobin drop were recorded. ROTEM findings were compared between transfused and nontransfused patients, and also between patients with and without excessive bleeding. Higher values of postoperative FIBTEM maximum clot firmness (MCF) were associated with lower risks of transfusion (odds ration [OR]: 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.78, p <0.001) and excessive bleeding (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.36-0.94, p =0.028). A postoperative FIBTEM MCF value <= 10mm had 80.1% (95% CI: 73.1-85.9%) sensitivity with 75.5% (95% CI: 60.4-87.1%) specificity to predict transfusion requirements, and 70.5% (95% CI: 63.6-76.8%) sensitivity with 88.8% (95% CI: 51.7-99.7%) specificity to predict excessive bleeding. The estimated average probability of transfusion in patients with FIBTEM MCF values of 0 to 4mm is 86.3%. ROTEM assay demonstrated high predictive ability for transfusion and excessive bleeding. Identification of patients at risk for transfusion could allow blood banks to ensure adequate blood supply, while also more intense blood-salvaging strategies could be implemented in these patients.

Rotational Thromboelastometry Predicts Transfusion Requirements in Total Joint Arthroplasties

Piovani, Daniele;Bonovas, Stefanos;
2023-01-01

Abstract

The frequency of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions is high in total joint arthroplasties, and the hemorrhagic risk is associated with both surgery- and patient-related factors. This study aims to assess the ability of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) to identify patients at high risk for transfusion and excessive bleeding. A prospective observational study was conducted including 206 patients who underwent total knee or hip arthroplasties. Assessment of the coagulation status was performed preoperatively and immediately postoperatively using ROTEM analysis and conventional coagulation tests. The number of RBC transfusions and the postoperative hemoglobin drop were recorded. ROTEM findings were compared between transfused and nontransfused patients, and also between patients with and without excessive bleeding. Higher values of postoperative FIBTEM maximum clot firmness (MCF) were associated with lower risks of transfusion (odds ration [OR]: 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.78, p <0.001) and excessive bleeding (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.36-0.94, p =0.028). A postoperative FIBTEM MCF value <= 10mm had 80.1% (95% CI: 73.1-85.9%) sensitivity with 75.5% (95% CI: 60.4-87.1%) specificity to predict transfusion requirements, and 70.5% (95% CI: 63.6-76.8%) sensitivity with 88.8% (95% CI: 51.7-99.7%) specificity to predict excessive bleeding. The estimated average probability of transfusion in patients with FIBTEM MCF values of 0 to 4mm is 86.3%. ROTEM assay demonstrated high predictive ability for transfusion and excessive bleeding. Identification of patients at risk for transfusion could allow blood banks to ensure adequate blood supply, while also more intense blood-salvaging strategies could be implemented in these patients.
2023
bleeding risk
coagulopathy
joint replacements
rotational thromboelastometry
transfusion
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/81326
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