Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease that affects multiple organs, leading to elevated morbidity and mortality with limited treatment options. The early detection of organ involvement is challenging as there is currently no serum marker available to predict the progression of SSc. The aptamer technology proteomic analysis holds the potential to correlate SSc manifestations with serum proteins up to femtomolar concentrations. Methods: This is a two-tier study of serum samples from women with SSc (including patients with interstitial lung disease - ILD - at high-resolution CT scan) and age-matched healthy controls (HC) that were first analyzed with aptamer-based proteomic analysis for over 1300 proteins. Proposed associated proteins were validated by ELISA first in an independent cohort of patients with SSc and HC, and selected proteins subject to further validation in two additional cohorts. Results: The preliminary aptamer-based proteomic analysis identified 33 proteins with significantly different concentrations in SSc compared to HC sera and 9 associated with SSc-ILD, including proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and cell-cell adhesion, angiogenesis, leukocyte recruitment, activation, and signaling. Further validations in independent cohorts ultimately confirmed the association of specific proteins with early SSc onset, specific organ involvement, and serum autoantibodies. Conclusions: Our multi-tier proteomic analysis identified serum proteins discriminating patients with SSc and HC or associated with different SSc subsets, disease duration, and manifestations, including ILD, skin involvement, esophageal disease, and autoantibodies.

Proteomic aptamer analysis reveals serum biomarkers associated with disease mechanisms and phenotypes of systemic sclerosis

Ceribelli, Angela;Selmi, Carlo;De Santis, Maria
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease that affects multiple organs, leading to elevated morbidity and mortality with limited treatment options. The early detection of organ involvement is challenging as there is currently no serum marker available to predict the progression of SSc. The aptamer technology proteomic analysis holds the potential to correlate SSc manifestations with serum proteins up to femtomolar concentrations. Methods: This is a two-tier study of serum samples from women with SSc (including patients with interstitial lung disease - ILD - at high-resolution CT scan) and age-matched healthy controls (HC) that were first analyzed with aptamer-based proteomic analysis for over 1300 proteins. Proposed associated proteins were validated by ELISA first in an independent cohort of patients with SSc and HC, and selected proteins subject to further validation in two additional cohorts. Results: The preliminary aptamer-based proteomic analysis identified 33 proteins with significantly different concentrations in SSc compared to HC sera and 9 associated with SSc-ILD, including proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and cell-cell adhesion, angiogenesis, leukocyte recruitment, activation, and signaling. Further validations in independent cohorts ultimately confirmed the association of specific proteins with early SSc onset, specific organ involvement, and serum autoantibodies. Conclusions: Our multi-tier proteomic analysis identified serum proteins discriminating patients with SSc and HC or associated with different SSc subsets, disease duration, and manifestations, including ILD, skin involvement, esophageal disease, and autoantibodies.
2023
aptamer technology
connective tissue disease
immunology
interstitial lung disease
proteomics
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11699/85349
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